Monthly Archives: May 2016

Your Makes Vol. 4

Hey! I’m back with another round-up of all the beautiful things you guys have been making with our fabrics. Prepare to be inspired ūüôā

Noble-Daughter-Victoria-Blazer-1Charlotte from Noble & Daughter made the most beautiful By Hand London Victoria Blazer¬†in our popular floral viscose twill. Sadly this fabric is sold out (I know – I’m crying too).¬†We sold a ton of it though,¬†so I get to see it pop up¬†from time to time and¬†swoon again and again.

That-Crazy-Stitch-JumpsuitYou guys! When I saw this jumpsuit from Malia of That Crazy Stitch, I freaked. I am so into this bohemian vibe. Plus: this patchwork print viscose is still available in the shop!

Helens-Closet-ArcherI won’t lie to you, I have wanted to copy this tencel denim button-up since the moment I saw it. The Grainline¬†Archer Shirt and our slubby tencel denim¬†are a match made in heaven! Check out more lovely photos on Helen’s Closet.

Pudge-Nico-ArumHow cute does Nicole look in her Deer & Doe Arum Dress? This polka dot tencel denim is sold out, but we have a dark wash tencel denim that would look equally awesome!

Lladybird-MarlboroughHere’s one of our black findings kits in action! Lauren used it for a classic¬†Marlborough Bra. I need one of these in my life!

Anna-Zoe-Hemlock

Anya made an awesome Hemlock dress out of our sweater knit from last fall. This fabric lends itself so well to the simple lines of this dress. Love it!

Let’s not forget instagram. Here are some of my favourites from the #blackbirdfabrics tag. (All images below are linked and will take you to¬†the original photo.)

Here are the fabrics that are still available from the instagram makes: moss tencel twill, black tencel twill, bird print viscose, and navy shirting!

Want to make it into my next maker round-up? If you sew something with a fabric from the shop, just e-mail, instagram, facebook, or tweet me a link!

Indigo Dye Nights

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Last week, I spent two evenings learning all about indigo and shibori dyeing at Maiwa in Vancouver. I had so much fun you guys! This class was a birthday gift from my boyfriend, so it felt extra special to take a break from my usual routine and get my hands dirty (literally – my nails are still stained with a hint of blue).

We spent the first day learning technique, and preparing our pieces for the dye bath. The amazing teachers Sophena and Danielle were clearly super passionate about indigo dyeing and all of the techniques. They brought tons of samples to inspire us.

We were given a set of cloth napkins, a huge cotton gauze scarf and various small silk and cotton pieces to test on.

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The dyeing all happened on the second night of the class. The energy in there was awesome. Everyone was so pumped to get their pieces dyed, and we only had a couple of hours so the night zoomed by. Want to see how my pieces turned out?
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I tried a few different techniques on my napkins: stitch resist,¬†binding (one with string and one with elastics, rocks, and marbles), and finally, “the cloud”. The cloud was the most quick and fun – it’s really just bunching the fabric together and tying it up. I wish I took before pictures!

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I used my silk pieces to try out stitch resist in circle shapes, and tying in a knot! The second piece is literally just tied twice.

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The folding and clamping technique was my favourite by a long shot. The two pieces above were made with triangle shape resists. I’m am in love with them!

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Finally, my scarf! This was made using a simple method of folding in half, rolling on the bias, and scrunching the fabric. Again – I promise I will take before pictures next time.

The coolest thing about shibori is the instant gratification! You tie, bind, fold, or clamp your pieces, dye them, let them oxidize, and then you can unwrap your work and see the results pretty much instantly. The unveiling is the best part. Every piece was so beautiful and unique.

I can’t wait¬†to grab some supplies and try this again at home. I see a lot of indigo dyeing in my future!